Brit Andersen Motorsports

 
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size
Home Press Releases
Latest
Track Facts PDF Print E-mail
By Todd Baptista

Although the SYRA, or Seekonk Youth Racing Association events have no purse attached, the 10 to 15-year old drivers compete with the same fire and determination that their older counterparts offer. Certainly one of the season’s most exciting feature race finished took place on July 14. That night, Brit Andersen’s blue and white #70 bested josh Lima and Steven Heroux in a tight battle to the checkered. Climbing from his winning mount, it was apparent that Andersen was a bit younger than his fellow front-runners were. As we get older, a couple of years really don’t seem to matter much. But at age 12, 15 seems a long way away. In his 12 short years, however, Brit Andersen has achieved more accolades in racing than some drivers experience in a lifetime.
    
“My dad used to take me to quarter midgets,” Brit remembers. “I started racing them myself when I was five.” In the six years that followed, Brit became an undeniable standout in quarter midgets, taking the 1994 Rookie of the Year award, 84 wins, 7 track championships, 4 regional championships, and breaking 14 individual track records. Racing on ovals as far away as Indiana, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Florida, he even shattered a record held by current Winston Cup star Jeff Gordon at the Tangerine Invitational quarter midget event in Orlando, Florida. “The competition was good,” Brit downplays. “It could be really hard.”
    
Andersen’s proudest racing moment thus far involved an event at Oak Lane Speedway in Quakertown, Pennsylvania. “I qualified for the B main a raced my way into the A main,” he recalls. “There was 40 lap feature and I started eighth. A spark plug wire fell off so I had to come in and get it fixed. I went back out and my bonnet blew off and landed right where my dad was. I had to come in for that. Then the spark plug wire came off again. I went back out but got called for a charge (penalty) and had to start at the back for a fourth time. But I still ended up winning the race. That was an exciting one.”
    
Although Brit’s Citrix-Gravel Automotive sponsored machine sports the yellow rookie stripe across its rear bumper, this young man sees his rise from quarter midgets to SYRA as a natural progression. “It’s hard, but it hasn’t been too overwhelming,” he admits. One of only five of the 14 SYRA drivers to compete in every event this season, Andersen currently sits third in the points race. With just a month to go in the season, Brit and Tom Donahue seem destined to compete for the Rookie of the Year award right down to the final week, and honor on which Brit has set his sights.
    
Certainly the key ingredient to the team’s success is the support, enthusiasm, and dedication of Brit’s father, Andy. “We work on the car every night,” Andy admits. “We do our homework. We’ve sacrificed a lot to get to this point, but it’s exciting. This is just a natural progression for him.” On race day, the family travels 104 miles each way from the New Haven area, specifically Branford, Connecticut, to compete at Seekonk.
    
Capturing his first checkered flag here last month, Brit appeared to surprise himself. “It was awesome!” he exclaimed. “I didn’t expect it to come that soon.” Dad Andy and step-mom Leslie, unquestionable Brit’s biggest supporters, were equally thrilled. “The whole season has been exciting, but when we won that feature, that was just icing on the cake,” Andy explains.
    
Although the Andersens have mentioned the Mini-Modifieds, the four cylinder class once dominated by the likes of Dick Houlihan, as a possible future step, the family appears in no hurry to rush the natural order of things. Although Brit won’t be eligible for his driver’s license for another four years, that milestone already evokes a groan of anxiety from his dad. Yet, for all of the success he has enjoyed, the young Mr. Andersen appears atypically shy, modest in his achievements, refreshingly polite and mature for his years. It is apparent that Andy and Leslie have taught Brit a lot about life off the track, building virtues that hint to a bright future in racing and beyond.
 
Brit Andersen: Former SYRA Champ Returns As Rising Open Wheel Star PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 08 July 2002 00:00
By Kristen and Todd Baptista

When Brit Andersen first took to the 1/3-mile Seekonk Speedway oval in 2001, he had already accomplished more in eight years of racing than many achieve over the course of their entire career. From the Quarter Midget ranks, where he began at the age of five, to the USAC Ford Focus Series, the 16-year old has continued to turn heads, frequently traveling to Virginia and the Carolinas in search of the checkered flag.
    
The Branford, CT young gun’s seven-year Quarter Midget career produced eleven track championships, four regional crowns, one Rookie of the Year award, 14 track records, and in excess of 80 wins. At the Tangerine Invitational in Orlando, Florida, Andersen shattered a record that had been established by a young Jeff Gordon.
    
For three years, Brit, his father, Andy, and step-mom, Leslie, made the 215-mile round trip to Seekonk to campaign their Citrix-sponsored mini-cup in the Seekonk Youth Racing Association. The team finished in the top three in points all three years, earning the 2001 Rookie of the Year title, the 2002 championship, and a total of six feature wins.
    
Last season, the Andersens moved on, testing the waters in the three-quarter midget ranks before moving on to the Ford Focus Series. On September 18, 2004, Brit made headlines when he copped his first checkered flag in the series at Hickory Speedway in North Carolina. Clearly, Brit Andersen is the real deal.
    
On June 18, Brit returned to Seekonk Speedway with the USAC northeast Ford Focus Series. Similar in style to a traditional midget race car, Ford Focus cars utilize a traditional fuel injection system, high performance ignition and exhaust systems, and a modified wet sump oil system.
    
Noticeably taller than when he last raced at the Cement Palace, the teenager was just as polite and enthusiastic as the day he left. But, quite obviously, he’s not the same racer who left here at the end of the 2003 season. There’s a serious side to the young man who watches over every detail of his car’s setup, analyzes the competition, and approaches each race with a blend of exuberance and patience. At the end of the 25-lap main event that night, Brit Andersen again sat in D. Anthony Venditti Victory Lane. It was the 97th time in his 11-year career that Brit had carried the checkered flag.
    
“In the heat race, I was thinking it would be nice to be able to win here again,” Brit explains. “I hadn’t been happy with the car in practice, but we ended up winning the heat. In the feature, I got up to fifth and started to feel like I was running out of time. Then we caught a caution, made up some ground, and ended up winning the feature. It was pretty cool all around.”
    
While some may have felt that Andersen held an advantage over his Focus Series challengers based on his years in the SYRA division here, the driver insists that’s not the case. “I never ran a high-powered vehicle here before, and so I had never run that line around the track,” he states. “Coming here to race with the Focus car is like going to any other track for us. You need to figure out the line that you need to run to be fast, and then figure out the setup you need to run that line. Luckily, we were able to do both.”
    
Since making the jump to the open-wheel touring ranks, the Andersens have logged literally thousands of miles traveling from Connecticut to race tracks hundreds of miles away in the South. “I’d say it’s been hard on my dad, because he’s had to drive a lot of miles,” Brit admits. “I just turned 16 and a-half, so I’ll be able to help him with that soon. I know it’s been tough, and I appreciate everything my family has done for me.”
    
One of the most interesting aspects of the Focus Series is the level of competition. The division boasts a number of up-and-coming teenage “young guns” who have already acquired many years of racing experience. Putting over a dozen of these hot shoes into self-starting, open-wheel cars, powered by 178 horsepower, 124 cubic inch Ford Zetec ZX3 engines has been an exciting opportunity for all those involved. “The guys and girls in this series have a lot of experience, and it’s been a real challenge to race against them,” Brit agrees. “We’ve been learning so many new things from them, and it’s been a lot of fun.”
    
With the amount of talent slipping into firesuits around the country each week, competitors have found that the best way to get noticed by the movers and shakers in the country’s upper echelon racing series is to travel and compete on their home turf. “If you want to make it as a racer, you have to be willing to travel,” Andersen adds. “You have to be able to go where these people are watching you. We’ve been very lucky that that’s started to happen for us.”
    
Since hitting the road, the Andersens have made friendships with folks like Chris Romano, Bob Dillner, and Andy Hillenburg. While Brit’s name has been mentioned in the same sentences as ARCA and the Dodge Driver Development program, he appears quite comfortable to take things a day at a time. “Realistically, I know I need more Late Model-style, heavy car experience for the ARCA series,” Brit offers. “The cars are about three times heavier than what I’m used to, so it would really be a big step – like moving into a Cadillac.”
    
The Andersens do admit that they’ve had some discussions related to the Hooters Pro Cup Series and the NASCAR Elite Series in the Midwest for the future. Brit and his family are grateful for the unconditional support of their longtime sponsor, Citrix, a global leader in workplace software and services, headquartered in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. “Citrix has been great,” the driver impresses. “Our goal is to be able to bring our sponsor to one of these teams, and that they’ll supply everything else.” If the right deal cam about, Brit states he wouldn’t be averse to hopping into a NEMA or ISMA ride as well. “If our schedules could be coordinated, I’d definitely be willing to talk about it,” he states.
    
Brit reports that the team isn’t running for points in the Ford Focus Series as they’ve had to bypass a pair of events on the 16 race calendar already. “School is still a top priority for me, and I missed those races because I needed to be in school in Branford. Still, we’ve been running eighty or ninth in the points and have been making progress. Now that I’ve had some time in the car, it’s getting a bit easier, and it’s a lot more fun.”
    
In his travels, Andersen has grown fond of the 4/10-mile track at Hickory, North Carolina. “South Boston is really fast. Hickory is also fast, and it’s where I got my first win in the series, so that’s a favorite of mine, too. Down there, the stands at these tracks are packed every single week.”
    
With the pathway that Brit Andersen has chosen, tonight’s USAC Northeast Ford Focus event may be one of the last times that Seekonk fans have an opportunity to watch this rising star in person. Whether its newspapers, radio or television, however, most folks would be willing to be it won’t be the last time they’ll see or hear his name.
 
Young Branford racer has major aspirations PDF Print E-mail

By Todd Baptista
New Haven Register

In NASCAR Winston Cup racing, a lot of recent attention has been directed toward the so-called “young guns.”
    
Drivers like Kurt Busch, Ryan Newman and Kevin Harbick have made names for themselves at auto racing’s highest level of competition before reaching the age of 30.
    
In a sport where rookies are identified by a yellow stripe that adorns their back bumper, there is clearly no substitute for experience. The same holds true for short track racers, a group of literally thousands of hopefuls who compete in the ¼- and 5/8-mile tracks across the country on any given weekend.
    
In the old days, these day-job hobbyists were referred to as backyard racers. It is on the local dirt and paved ovals of America that dreams are fulfilled and thwarted. From these ranks come the stars of tomorrow, the big names of NASCAR’s premiere circuits.
    
Danbury’s Jerry Nadeau has been a regular on the Winston Cup tour for several years. Norwalk native Randy Lajoie is a two-time champion in the Bush Grand National series.
    
Indeed the drivers hail from all parts of the country and often begin their racing and elementary school education at the same age.
    
Such is the path that Branford’s Brit Andersen is following. Andersen, 13, has achieved more accolades in racing than some drivers experience in a life-time.
    
“My dad used to take me to quarter midgets,” Andersen said. “I started racing them myself when I was 5.”
    
In the six years that followed, Andersen became an undeniable standout in the quarter midget class. Racing on tracks as far away as Pennsylvania and Florida, Andersen won the 1994 Rookie of the Year award, registering 84 wins, seven track championships, four regional championships and breaking 14 individual track records.
    
At the Tangerine Invitational quarter midget race in Orlando, Fla., he broke a record that was set by Jeff Gordon.
    
In 2000, Brit and his father, Andy, and stepmother, Leslie, set their sights on Seekonk Speedway, a 1/3-mile paved oval in southeastern Massachusetts. Every Saturday night, from May through September, the Andersens made the 215-mile round trip to Seekonk to compete in the Seekonk Youth Racing Association.
    
Also known as the “Mini Cups,” the SYRA class is open to competitors between the ages of 10 and 16. These small-scale versions of Chevrolets, Dodges, and other cars are entered by the driver through a roof flap.
    
Today’s technology, however, has made the SYRA cars fast, competitive and safe. Carburetor restrictor plates, similar to the ones used to limit the speed of Winston Cup engines, keep the SYRA’s racing at a reasonable clip.
    
Full roll cages and Nerf bars necessitate the roof flap entry and maximize driver protection in the case of a crash. During the races, which generally run between 10 and 30 laps, NASCAR officials can remain in contact with the young drivers via one-way radio communication.
    
Sponsored by Citrix and Nas-Karz Racing Collectibles, Brit’s No.  70 finished in the top five. He won three SYRA feature races and finished in third place in the points standings.
    
He was recently named the 2002 SYRA Rookie of the Year. He’s returned to racing in the SYRA series again this season, winning the feature event on opening day May 5.
    
“We work on the car every night,” Andy Andersen said. “We do our homework. We’ve sacrificed a lot to get to his point, but it’s exciting. There are a lot of new cars and teams coming in this year and it should make for a great year.”
    
Since NASCAR recently instituted a minimum age requirement of 18 for its sanctioned professional events, Andersen won’t be eligible to race professionally for five more years.
    
Still the Andersens are hopeful that Brit’s eight years of racing are just the beginning of a long career.  

 
Branford Racer Brit Andersen Continues to Excel PDF Print E-mail

By Todd Baptista

In  NASCAR Winston Cup Racing, much attention has been directed toward the so-called “young guns”.  Rivers like Kurt Busch, Ryan Newman and Kevin Harvick have made a name for themselves in auto racing’s highest level of competition before reaching the age of 30.  In a sport where rookies are identified by a yellow stripe that adorns their back bumper, there is clearly o substitute for experience.  The same holds true for short track racers, a group of literally thousands of hopefuls who compete on ¼ to 5/8 mile tracks across the country on any given weekend.  In the old days, these day-job hobbyists were referred to as “backyard racers”.  It is on the local dirt and paved ovals of America that dreams are both fulfilled and thwarted.  From these ranks come the starts of tomorrow, the biog names on NASCAR’s premier circuits-Busch North, Craftsman Truck, Busch Grand National and Winston Cup.  Danbury’s Jerry Nadeau has been a regular on the Winston Cup tour for several years.  Norwalk native Randy Lajoie is a two-time champion in the Busch Grand National series.  In deed the cream of the crop hail from all parts of the country and often begin their racing and elementary school education in the same year.

Such is the path that Branford’s Brit Andersen is following.  The 13-year old has achieved more accolades in racing that some drivers experience in a lifetime.  “My dad used to take me to quarter midgets,” Brit recalls.  “I started racing them myself when I was five.”  In the six years that followed, the youngster became an undeniable standout in the quarter midget class.  Racing on tracks as far away as Indiana, Pennsylvania and Florida, Andersen won the 1994 Rookie of the Year Award, captured 84 wins, 7 track championships, 4 regional championships, and broke 14 individual track records.  As the Tangerine Invitational Quarter Midget Race in Orlando, Florida, Brit shattered a record set by Jeff Gordon himself.

In 2000, Brit, his dad Andy, and step-mom Leslie, set their sights on Seekonk Speedway, a 1/3 mile paved oval located in Southeastern Massachusetts, just across the eastern Rhode Island border.  Every Saturday night from May through September, the Andersens made the 215 mile round trip to Seekonk to compete in the new Seekonk Youth Racing Association, or SYRA, class.   Also known as the “Mini-Cups”, the SYRA class is open to competitors between the ages of 10-16 years of age.  These small-scale versions of Chevrolets, Doges and the like, are entered by the driver through a roof flap and resemble full-bodied, sophisticated go-carts at the first glance.  Today’s technology, however, has made the SYRA cars fast. Competitive, and above all, safe.

Carburetor restrictor plates, similar to the ones that are employed to limit speed of Winston Cup engines at the superspeedways in Daytona and Talledega, keep the SYRAs racing at a reasonable clip. Full roll cages and nerf bars necessitate the roof flaps entry and maximize driver protection in the case of a crash.  During the race, which generally runs between 10 and 30 laps, NASCAR officials can remain in contact with the young drivers via one way radio communication.

Sponsored by Citrix and Nas-Karz Racing Collectibles, Brit’s white #70, compete with yellow flame decals quickly found its way to the front of the pack.  Going wheel to wheel on a weekly basis with 14-15 year olds, he regularly finished in the top five.  On July 14, he captured his first of three SYRA feature race wins.  Points are awarded to the drivers based on their finishing position with the winner receiving 50 point the

 
Seekonk Sentiel Driver Profile Feature Brit Andersen: “Syra Championship Contender” PDF Print E-mail
Saturday, 01 June 2002 00:00
by Kristen and Todd Baptista

At the age of 13, Brit Andersen has no trouble finding his way to Victory Lane. In an 8-year career that began in Quarter Midgets, the Branford, CT teenager has chalked up a staggering 89 feature wins including five in the Cement Palace’s SYRA division over the past year and a-half. Brit began his career racing Quarter Midgets in 1994. The then-five year old won the Rookie of the Year award and traveled to facilities in Indiana, Pennsylvania, and Florida to compete. Over the next six years, he shattered 14 track records, grabbed 7 track championships and 4 regional crowns. One of Andersen’s greatest achievements to date was surpassing a record established by a young Jeff Gordon at the Tangerine Invitational Quarter Midget event in Orlando, Florida.
    
Last season, Brit, his dedicated father, Andy, and enthusiastic step-mom, Leslie, committed to running the Seekonk Youth Racing Association schedule, a weekly 215-mile round trip from home. On July 14, he earned his first checkered flag in the class, cementing his reputation as a bona fide front-runner. In 16 points events, Brit finished in the top five 11 times, ending the season 3rd in points. At the 56th annual banquet in January, Andersen was awarded the SYRA Rookie of the Year trophy. “It was hard but it wasn’t too overwhelming,” he explains. “The competition was really good but my desire was to win the Rookie of the Year award.” In the first 8 races this season, the team has posted four top fives including a pair of wins.
    
The smaller scale 2002 white Pontiac Grand Prix, with yellow flame decals is sponsored by Citrix, a global leader in virtual workplace software and services headquartered in Fort Lauderdale, FL. Associate sponsorship is provided by NAS-KARZ Racing Collectibles, located in Wallingford, CT, Mickey D’s Tavern of West Haven, CT, Goody’s Hardware and Paint, and Ferrucci Signs, both of East Haven, CT. Dad Andy is the # 70’s crew chief and the key to keeping the yellow flames burning brightly at the head of the pack. “We work on the car every night,” Andy confesses. “We’ve sacrificed alot to get to this point, but it’s exciting.” The 2001 Avenger Chassis sports a power plant built by the North Carolina-based Mountain Machine firm. Eric Mey, who assists with the car’s set up, and Ernie Ferrucci, helps the team prepare for competition.
    
An 8th grader at Branford’s Walsh Intermediate Middle School, Brit’s most shining accomplishments in racing have undoubtedly been his 11 Quarter Midget championships, earned at Silver City in Meriden, CT, and Thompson, CT’s Little-T. Racing at Oaklane, PA, Andersen experienced one of the most hard-earned victories of his career. “I was in the A main feature and started eighth,” he recalls. “On the second lap, I got taken out and went into the pits. I came back out, and on the fourth lap, a spark plug wire came off, so I came in and got repaired. Then, when I went back out, the bonnet that covers the engine came off and flew right to where my dad was. I came in, we put that back on, and went back out. Then, I got called for a charge and had to go to the back. I started working my way up and won the race after coming from the back four times.”
    
Andersen admits that the switch from Quarter Midgets to SYRA racing hasn’t altered his racing philosophy or driving style. “It really hasn’t. Now that there’s more cars, I’m using Quarter Midget traffic skills to race here. With the heavier traffic, you have to think like this,” he relates with a snap of the fingers. Brit’s favorite on-track competitors are the ones who, he explains, “will let me go if I’m faster, and I’ll let them get by if they’re faster.”
    
Tentatively, Andersen is scheduled to make an appearance at his sponsor’s Route 5 Wallingford, CT store, Nas-Karz Racing Collectibles, along with established Winston Cup stars from the Bodine family. That event should take place in the early fall. Next season, the family is preparing to test the TQ waters in Pennsylvania, campaigning a winged three-quarter midget. Since the Keystone State is the only one where a 14-year old can compete in the series, Brit expects to be back in the SYRA car at Seekonk on a part-time basis when the TQ tour runs outside Pennsylvania.
    
In the interim, the team is focused squarely on the 2002 SYRA crown. “My goal is to win the championship and I think we’ve got a really good shot at it,” Brit relates. By virtue of his fourth place finish last Saturday, Brit has moved back into second in the points chase, just 16 behind current leader Justin Travis. With the poise, patience, and maturity that he’s developed on and off the track, the teenager has the wherewithal to pull off that feat and eagerly anticipates racing in tonight’s Mid-Season Championship event. “I really like the longer events,” he enthuses. “I’d like to have 100 lappers!”
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next > End >>

Page 5 of 6

Our Partners

Our Partners

Our Partners